About

Derived from the word epicure, foodiecure is about the art and enjoyment of eating healthy.

This blog was started because I am a student of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) who loves food. One day it dawned on me that I had a problem. Healthy food was boring, and yummy food was fattening.  “What about blending fine dining with healthy eating?” I thought.

There’s something in this Chinese Medicine caper, so it stands to reason that Naturopathy, Ayurvedic, modern medicine and some other traditional cultures (Indigenous Australia for example) have something to offer also.

foodiecure explores different food ingredients, cooking with ‘medicinal’ herbs, cooking methods, cultural eating and tinkering with some diets. All the while, trying my hand at a little gourmet thrown in. Think textures, flavour combinations, presentation.

There’s a world of food out there!

And there’s so much more to “healthy” than vitamins and minerals. It is also how we eat to promote functional digestion.

Whatareyatalkinabout woman? See, watching your weight and being healthy are interchangeable. If you ain’t got good digestion, you ain’t getting those nutrients or pooping out the waste. The primary cause of weight gain is toxins that aren’t properly eliminated. Which means they’re stuck in your body. Stagnating. Euck.

This is a learning exercise as much for me as it is for you. Via research, eating, creating and eating some more.

So I gathered what I know so far, and developed the foodiecure philosophy:

  • First thing in your gut, a glass of warm water. This gently prepares your stomach to receive the first meal of the day. If you like, add a tiny amount of lemon juice (don’t over do it) or a small dash of organic, unrefined apple cider vinegar. Stick with it, you will get used to it!
  • Food & drink at body temperature or warmer only. I explain it like this:
    your body = 37C
    room temperature = 20 – 22C
    fridge = 4C
    ice = -4C.
    That’s a big temperature difference for your body to warm up. So your stomach borrows energy from other organs also striving to keep you alive at every nano second. Some bozo made up the notion that consuming cold foods/drink speed up the metabolism. Think the judo method, work with the body’s natural energy flow.
  • Always, always eat breakfast. Preferably something that is Spleen nurturing (a Chinese Medicine term that you will become very familiar with while reading foodiecure). See blog for inspiration.
  • Energy in the stomach, not in the head. Never eat when upset or arguing. Avoid other distractions  such as reading, watching television, at your desk or driving.
  • Chew to loose. Enzymes in your saliva aid digestion – especially the ones that break down fats. As the Chinese Medicine saying goes “drink your food and eat your drink”.
  • The 80/20 rule: 80% plant based and 20% animal based foods. Like they used to in the olden days. Genetics hasn’t caught up to the era of excess yet. Plus you’ll be doing your bit for the environment. Bonus!
  • Remember to breathe. Like, right down to the bottom of your lungs. After all, air is more immediately important than food. And it works together with food energy to keep you tip-top.
  • When preparing meals think about balancing all the flavours of salty, sweet, pungent, sour and bitter (the 5 flavours in Chinese Medicine). A well balanced meal equals a harmonious system. You’ll learn how by reading this blog. Meanwhile I found this handy chart:

    Source: healingqigong.org

  • Eat seasonal and local. Blogged about to death, but it will come up here also because it’s that relevant
  • Invest in a good mandolin. You know what I said earlier about presentation and textures? I mandolin everything nowadays – dazzle with minimum frazzlenot

     

  • Eating fermented foods are really, really important to gut health as I’m now discovering. I will start covering this more in upcoming blogs.
  • Last but the most important point underpinning all these, is a healthy mentality and awareness. The integrative nutrition food pyramid is different to the one we are familiar with (developed by the US Department of Agriculture). This philosophy doesn’t consider that the quality of food has changed in the last 60 years (farming practices, soil depletion and all that) and ignores the strong connection between mind-body-spirit. If we were to consider this connection (and take commercilisation hooplah out of the equation), the food pyramid would look more like this:
  • Healing with Wholefoods, eating healthy, mind, body, spirit

As I said, this is a learning journey, if you have comments or thoughts you’d like to add – please do!

You can also find me:

Twitter: @foodiecure
Instagram: @foodiecure
Pintrest: foodiecure
Tumblr: foodiecure

 

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22 responses to About

  1. 

    What a brilliant idea for a blog. I think that most people have the major misconception that to eat well one has to eat blandly. This is not the case and Becki shows us how we can enjoy what we eat and have our bodies enjoy the enjoyment! I’ve had the pleasure of eating Becki’s cuisine and I can honestly say that the woman knows what she’s on about. Unusual and mouth watering flavours and all with a clear conscience. Superb!!

  2. 

    Nice to meet some who has a similar philosophy to mine when it comes to food, especially in Australia – as you say, there’s not many like us around. Here’s to spreading the word about whole foods, and what healthy eating REALLY means! Lovely to ‘meet’ you Beckie!

    Lesh

  3. 

    Awesome job fellow Melbournian!. Keep the articles coming!!! … and good luck with your studies.

  4. 
    Be Well And Happy January 8, 2013 at 8:10 am

    Have you heard of Daverick Leggett? He was one of my
    teachers – very interesting books on TCM and food. Thanks for
    dropping by my blog! 🙂

    • 

      Hi BW&H!! Yes I have – lucky you having him as one of your lecturers!! Where do you study?

      • 
        Be Well And Happy January 9, 2013 at 7:54 am

        He used to come and run workshops when I trained with the Shiatsu College in Brighton. That was around 14 years ago. I think he now runs Chi Kung workshops in Devon. His books are great – so easy to understand.

      • 

        Wow, how cool. I’ll do a bit more research on him. I’m really into Paul Pitchford, but I definitely like what I’ve read of Daverick’s also. Thanks for bring him to my attention again 🙂

  5. 

    I am very interested in damp and damping in the body since 3 different chinese doctors
    told me that is the reason for the diarrhea I have when eating raw or cooked vegies and fruits. what should I do to get better? Thanks, SS

    • 

      Hi Shakeh, wow your spleen function is really weak. Please follow the advice I’ve provided on the “about” pages and keep following my blog. That’s your best start. xx

  6. 

    Hi! 🙂 I just wanted to say thank you 🙂 It’s great to see people think like you. I wish you all the best! 🙂 Greetings from Canada! 🙂

  7. 

    I just found this site and I think it will be fun and a learning experience. In the foodiecure philosophy section it says “…enzymes in your saliva aid digestion – especially the ones that break down fats…”. I think that may be starches versus fats.

    • 

      Hi John, thank you fir your contribution. lipid digestion begins in the oral cavity from one of the enzymes, lipase, that constitute saliva. If we don’t chew well and integrate the saliva with what we are eating the process of lipid digestion is hindered.
      I’m not well versed in starch digestion – more than likely it starts in the mouth as well!
      Look after yourself,
      Becki x

  8. 

    Hi Becki,
    Lovely to meet you yesterday at the clinic and thank you for sharing your blog. I hope it’s ok but I’ve already shared with the gang at TOM organic as I think yours is a great site!
    I’ll be seeing Scott at the clinic weekly for awhile so hope to see you again. Always love a great conversation.
    Kate
    ps I should stipulate / preamble something of my own blog. It is called wonder. meant because they are simply the meanings I derive from my wonderings. I do not ever proclaim to be an expert on the matters I ponder in fact quite the opposite…that I am a human being figuring things out as I go along. With the work I do as a teacher and the life learning I have done along the way, my blog simply a sharing of the tools I have gathered that work for ME. I hope these insights and pondering provide some ideas for others in as much as get them to think about what might work best for them. Much love

  9. 

    Hello Becki, I love your blog and I’m happy to see blogs like this one alive!
    I’ve been reading about Qigong practice and meditation for almost a year and recently only (2 months) I started reading about TCM in regards to food and diet and I was really happy that I did, 6 months ago I started my battle with excess fat in an attempt to get rid of the extra fat on my body, I was following the modern approaches like calorie counting which is really foolish, I can’t believe advises they give people, they tell you to drink cold water and eat cold foods so that the body burns more calories to heat the food again, seriously its clearly seen how the Chinese teach us how to love our body which is the opposite to what is being taught today (torturing the body) and which the rest of the people can’t seem to understand.
    I would like your advice please, I don’t know if in your field of studies you get to know about Qigong practice, I’m performing the “8 pieces of brocade” every morning as soon as I wake up before or after breakfast, but I’m a bit confused on what should I eat in order for the spleen to function properly and restore its energy after all the life style torture it received, another question I would like to ask is, if the spleen energy is balanced, will the body start losing the fat and become more fit?
    sorry if this was long and thanks in advance, keep up the great work!

  10. 

    Hello Becki, I love your blog and I’m happy to see blogs like this one alive!
    I’ve been reading about Qigong practice and meditation for almost a year and recently only (2 months) I started reading about TCM in regards to food and diet and I was really happy that I did, 6 months ago I started my battle with excess fat in an attempt to get rid of the extra fat on my body, I was following the modern approaches like calorie counting which is really foolish, I can’t believe advises they give people, they tell you to drink cold water and eat cold foods so that the body burns more calories to heat the food again, seriously its clearly seen how the Chinese teach us how to love our body which is the opposite to what is being taught today (torturing the body) and which the rest of the people can’t seem to understand.
    I would like your advice please, I don’t know if in your field of studies you get to know about Qigong practice, I’m performing the “8 pieces of brocade” every morning as soon as I wake up before or after breakfast, but I’m a bit confused on what should I eat in order for the spleen to function properly and restore its energy after all the life style torture it received, another question I would like to ask is, if the spleen energy is balanced, will the body start losing the fat and become more fit?
    sorry if this was long and thanks in advance, keep up the great work!

    • 

      Hi Assal,
      I’m happy you’re finding good results with Qi Gong – it’s very powerful, and I love it too, I just don’t practice as much as I want.
      As far as advice for breakfast, well you’ve come to the right place. I’m a bit of a breakfast aficionado, and that naturally encompasses Spleen-promoting breakfasts. A lot of posts here are about breakfast – search the categories and it should bring up a bunch of posts. Also this post here is really popular and contains a lot of information about spleen-qi-promoting eating https://foodiecure.wordpress.com/2011/01/03/love-your-spleen-tcm-tongue-diagnosis-and-case-study/.
      In short: bland, cooked, warm, chew well, don’t do anything while eating if you want to maximise the benefits. 🙂
      Look after yourself,
      x Becki

Trackbacks and Pingbacks:

  1. In the Raw: an essay and a review (Yongs Green Foods) « Foodiecure - December 12, 2010

    […] pressure off the Spleen/Stomach function. This also helps ‘warm’ the food up. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again… chew. your. […]

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